News from the Book World

Reader’s Delight: Gollancz Big Black Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We love Penguin’s leather bound hardcovers. They basically cover good old classics. A lesser known but equally attractive offering is Gollancz’s Big Black Book series. There are just a few big black books in the series, but they offer some excellent compilations.

The Complete Chronicles of Conan by Robert E. Howard – Probably the only complete collection of original Conan stories. You are not a pulp fiction fan if you do not own this.

Conan’s Brethren: The Complete Collection by Robert E. Howard– The most unusual collection. It covers the exploits of the Solomon Kane, Howard’s first barbarian hero King Kull, Bran Mak Morn, Red Sonja and others.

Necronomicon: The Best Weird Tales by HP Lovecraft – Unlike the Barnes and Noble edition, this is not a complete collection. However, in terms of presentation, it is vastly superior with excellent illustrations and a comprehensive afterword by Stephen Jones.

Eldritch Tales: A Miscellany of the Macabre by H.P. Lovecraft – Includes Lovecraft’s remaining major stories plus his weird poetry, nonfiction, and the critical essay Supernatural Horror in Literature.

The Complete Lyonesse (Lyonesse #1-3) by Jack Vance – An omnibus edition of Vance’s magnum opus. Like a goodreads review rightly mentioned “If Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings is the greatest fantasy epic of the 20th century, then Lyonesse is surely the greatest fairy tale.”

Tarzan of the Apes & Other Tales by Edgar Rice Burroughs – A selective collection but the best Tarzan stories feature here.

The achievement of Gollancz BIg Black Book series is essentially its atypical selection of works along with great presentation. We have plenty of publishers playing safe with Dickens and Austen. Glad to see some good folks betting on Lovecraft and Howard.

 
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Cover of the Week

Cover of the Week: Prisoner of the Horned Helmet by James Silke / Frank Frazetta

Death Dealer Frank Frazetta

 

Death Dealer is a 1973 fantasy painting by legendary pulp artist Frank Frazetta. Its popularity led to a variety of spin offs including comic books and novels. The novels were written by James Silke and there were five installments in the series. Though the books were criticized for being too simplistic, Frazetta’s intense touch gave them an eerie feeling. The plots were silly, the characters were underdeveloped, the story was a stereotypical sword and sorcery tale, but to a certain degree, they do bring to life the vivid imagination of Frazetta through brutally rendered imageries and savage emotions. The above cover art evokes a feeling of a nuclear apocalypse though Frazetta himself often denied it. It is not the first in the series but undoubtedly carries the same menace and grittiness of the original painting and of course, it is my personal favorite.

Book 1: Prisoner of the Horned Helmet

Book 2: Lords of Destruction

Book 3: Tooth and Claw

Book 4: Plague of Knives

Book 5: Rise Of The Death Dealer

Cover art: Tor Books (1988), artist — Frank Frazetta

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Download ebook: 1984 by George Orwell (Audiobook)

1984 George Orwell

 

The much acclaimed and prophetic classic by Orwell has stood the test of time. Is it perfect? Absolutely not.

Does it have the flawless symmetry of Austen’s novels? Not really.

Could Orwell delineate the characters like Dostoevsky? Barely.

Does it have the devilish sense of humor so conspicuous of The Animal Firm? No.

Is the plot original? Far from it (check We by Yevgeny Zamyatin).

Does it have a touch of Salman Rushdie’s poetic story telling? Actually, it is more of an essay.

Orwell’s 1984 should be read for reasons of its own. In spite of its flaws, it makes a terrifying future too real for a work of fiction. It could be a Nazi Germany, a Fascist Italy, a so-called socialistic Russia, Napoleon’s despotic France or a combination of all of them. How common are “Big Brothers” in the world as it exists today? “Nothing was your own except the few cubic centimetres inside your skull.” — does this tone seem familiar across socio-economic-political levels? This is not a review of the book, so let the reader be the judge of how imposing Orwell view of the human future is.

“It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.” – what follows would possibly change the way you look at any ideology or propaganda and wonder, like Wordsworth said, “What man has made of man.”

Download ebook 1984 by George Orwell (Audiobook) – Click here

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